12/9/2010

Orange Recycle - Mobile Recycler Reviews and Information

Who are Orange Recycle?

With mobile phone recycling becoming so popular it should come as no surprise that there are now over 30 well known mobile recycling companies. Some, such as Mazuma Mobile and Envirofone, have built their reputation from the ground up while some other already established companies such as Orange are now adding mobile recycling services to their existing brand.

As a company which sells a huge number of phones each year it would have been clear to Orange that with more phones than people in the UK already, most of those buying a new handset will have at least one old mobile they need to get rid of.

Orange are a well established mobile network operator. They are one of the largest telecom operators in the world and as of 2009 had almost 200 million customers. In addition to their mobile recycling and mobile network services they also provide home broadband to over ten million subscribers across Europe. Both Orange and T-Mobile are now under the control of Everything Everywhere Limited although both brands are still being operated individually.

So how does selling my mobile phone to Orange Recycle work?

Using Orange Recycle is very similar to using many other mobile phone recyclers. Simply enter the make and model of your phone on the Orange Recycle website and they will give you a value for your old mobile. Orange Recycle will then send you a freepost envelope to send them your old mobile in. Once you’ve popped your old phone in the post just sit back and wait for them to send your payment!

What do Orange Recycle do with all these old phones?

Well depending on the model and condition they will either reuse or recycle the handset. A phone in working condition with commercial value will usually be checked for criminal activity, any data on the phone is wiped and the phone is tested. Providing it meets all requirements the handset will then be sold on to a developing country where brand new mobile phones are currently very expensive.

If a handset is non-working or unusable then it will be dismantled and any recyclable materials will be extracted. Any valuable metals such as gold, platinum, solver and copper are extracted using an almost zero-emission process. Battery components such as Nickel Cadmium, Nickel Metal Hydride and Lithium are safely recycled and materials are recovered to be put back into productive use. Old chargers are sent to specialist recyclers where the metals are extracted and the plastics are recycled to make things such as traffic cones and buckets.

Which mobile recycler to use?

Picking which mobile recycler to use can be confusing, especially with so many to choose from! Keep an eye out on the Compare and Recycle mobile phone recycling reviews forum for Orange Recycle Reviews to see how other users have got on when using Orange Recycle. If you’re not sure where to find the best deal then visit Compare and Recycle who offer a mobile recycling price comparison to tell you the best price offered for your old mobile from over 30 top recyclers.

Lee

Lee

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